Member Exclusive Lectures

Member Exclusive Lectures

Enjoy exclusive lectures from leading experts. These lectures are only available to CCT Members.

Subscribe Share
Member Exclusive Lectures
  • Cathedral Treasures of England and Wales

    Janet Gough works on strategic projects to conserve and develop historic church buildings for wider enjoyment and writes and lectures regularly on ecclesiastical subjects. Formerly Director of Cathedrals and Church Buildings for the Church of England, Janet was awarded an OBE in 2017
    for servic...

  • The Fashion Chronicles with Amber Butchart

    From Eve's fig leaf to Joan of Arc's armour, the way we choose to clothe our bodies can carry layer upon layer of meaning. Across cultures and throughout history people have used clothing to signify power and status, to adorn and beautify, even to prop up or dismantle regimes.

    This talk is taken...

  • Crowning a Nation: Coronation and Historical Memory

    Coronations follow deep and meaningful ancient traditions, join Historian Helen Carr to explore their origins in this special lecture celebrating a year since the King's Coronation.

    Helen Carr is an award nominated historian specialising in English medieval history. Described by Dan Jones as ‘o...

  • 'Some blessed Hope’: Wildness beside us, every day

    Beccy Speight is Chief Executive Officer of the RSPB, the largest nature conservation organisation in the UK, with 1.2 million members, more than 2,000 employees and around 12,000 volunteers.

    The RSPB has more than 200 nature reserves across the UK; wild havens where everyone can get closer to ...

  • Writing on the Wall

    What if walls could talk? For historian Madeleine Pelling, they can - if you know where to look. A brilliant new cultural history of the long eighteenth century, Writing on the Wall is told through the marks its citizens left behind, bringing into focus lost voices from the highest to the lowest ...

  • John of Gaunt: A European Prince

    Son of Edward III, brother to the Black Prince, father to Henry IV and sire of all the Tudors, John of Gaunt was always close to the English crown. But was he too rich and too powerful and did he have his eye on his nephew’s throne? Why was he such a focus of hate in the Peasant’s Revolt of 1381?...

  • When Monumental Brasses Lie: Dynastic Mythmaking at Thame Church, Oxfordshire

    St Mary’s church in Thame houses a series of brass memorials to the Quatermain family, local gentry who came to prominence in the later medieval period. Four generations of the family are depicted, showcasing their steady lordship across the fifteenth century. Yet all is not as it seems. This tal...

  • Gifts and Books: from Ancient Temples to Modern Myths

    We all know about gift-giving: it can nurture our friendships and help to mark the most important moments in our lives. But gifts can also be a source of anxiety, or a reminder of unequal relationships. Writing has always existed alongside the dynamics of giving and exchanging, and in this lectur...

  • Flying To The Future

    Churches have been home to bats for hundreds of years, but having these fascinating species make a home in your church isn’t always a blessing…

    For the past five years the Bats In Churches Project, supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, has been working with architects, ecologists, ch...

  • Magisteria IN CONVERSATION

    Most things you ‘know’ about science and religion are myths or half-truths that grew up in the last years of the nineteenth century and remain widespread today.

    The true history of science and religion is a human one. It’s about the role of religion in inspiring, and strangling, science before t...

  • The Death of Alexander the Great

    On 10/11 June 323 BC, King Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander ‘the Great’, died in Babylon aged 32. In his lifetime, he had forged one of the largest empires the world had yet seen, theoretically stretching from Greece to the Punjab, from Egypt to Samarkand. What followed his dea...

  • How to Destroy a Demon (and a temple)

    The Hollywood story version of the clash between Christians and pagans is simple: in this story, nasty, brutish Romans throw gentle, uncomplaining Christians to the lions. The truth was more complicated - and Christianity was much less meek. When Christians came to power in the Roman world, they ...

  • Femina

    Extraordinary women have held positions of power throughout history. But, aside from the select few, why do we not hear about them? The middle ages are seen as a bloodthirsty time of Vikings, Saints and Kings: a patriarchal society that oppressed and excluded women. But by digging a little deeper...

  • Touching History

    Join us as we hear all about iconic church stories. Writer and broadcaster Peter Stanford, inveterate “church crawler” and author of ‘If These Stones Could Talk: A History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland’, published in paperback last year by Hodder, will share some favourite churches from ...

  • Scottish Country Houses and their Churches

    Although many new houses were constructed in a broadly classical style, others were inspired by the Scottish tradition of castellated architecture. In this talk, Emma Baillie will present her research into the history of three prominent Scottish country houses – Blair Castle, Inveraray (Inverer-r...

  • John Cruso in Norwich

    The name Crusoe is eternally linked with Daniel Defoe's castaway Robinson Crusoe. The Crusos were, however, a real-life family who took refuge in England during the Dutch Revolt. Dr. Christopher Joby has published a book on the life and work of one of the more illustrious members of this family, ...

  • Where the past meets the future

    DaeWha Kang will speak about his full regeneration of St Andrew Holborn, a Grade 1 listed church built by Wren and damaged in the war. In addition to a deep dive into architectural design and virtuoso craftsmanship, DaeWha will reflect on broader considerations of the design profession. In partic...

  • All Saints, Little Somborne

    The church of All Saints, Little Somborne (CCT) is not busy or grand. It lacks gilt and marble as well as electricity and plumbing. However, it is wondrously rich in stories. Frederick’s family have been connected to this church since the 16th Century and over the course of this talk, he will cha...

  • Feminism and the Bible

    This talk will provide evidence of the particular contributions of feminist interpretation of the Bible. However, no one has to a feminist to observe that many passages, motifs, themes, and the meta-narrative itself proclaim liberation—redemption—from oppression, subverting the patriarchy that it...

  • The Duke of Wellington: A life of Service

    Brig Michael Aris CBE DL and Richard Bennett DL, both experienced guides at the Duke of Wellington’s country home at Stratfield Saye, in Hampshire. They will give a fully illustrated presentation about the Life of Service which the 1st Duke of Wellington, known to all as 'The Great Duke'. This, b...

  • The Brunelleschi, Alberti and Italian churches in the early Renaissance

    Professor Howard has had a lifelong enthusiast for the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance particularly in Florence, and his talk today focusses on the churches of the two great pioneering architects of the early Renaissance, Brunelleschi and Alberti, who radically reshaped the desig...

  • The Parish Church on Screen

    In this lecture, Alice will talk through the history of three remarkable CCT churches which were featured, and also discuss more generally the challenges and thrills of bringing church and cathedral history to mainstream audiences.

    Alice Loxton is a historian, presenter and writer. She presents...

  • Arrow Sharpening Marks: An English Church Myth

    Across England, rows of parallel vertical scars can be found on church stonework, clustered around porches, doors and windows; for upwards of a century, local antiquarians have been assuring us that these marks were made by the archers of medieval England sharpening their arrows. This well-loved ...

  • Memento Mori II

    We welcome back Mark Hatton, an expert in the field of Memento Mori. These symbolic tropes act as a reminder of the inevitability of death and within this lecture are discussed in conjunction with the use of Adam and Eve imagery on eighteenth-century stones. As we venture further into this subjec...